Japanese Knotweed

Japanese knotweed (Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb. & Zucc.)

 

Distribution     |     Identification     |     Impacts     |     Prevention & Control

A thicket of Japanese knotweed. Citation: Tom Heutte, USDA Forest Service, www.invasives.org

BACKGROUND

Japanese knotweed (Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb. & Zucc.), a member of the buckwheat family, was introduced into the U.S. from Eastern Asia (Japan, China, Korea) as an ornamental on estates in the late-1800s. It has also been used as an erosion control plant. By the mid-1890s, it was reported near Philadelphia, PA, Schenectady, NY, and in New Jersey. Although once sold through seed and plant catalogs, by the late-1930s knotweed was already being viewed as a problematic pest. The plant, which can grow from three to 15 feet tall, has bamboo-like stems and is sometimes called Japanese bamboo. As with many invasive plants, knotweed thrives in disturbed areas and once established can spread rapidly, creating monoculture stands that threaten native plant communities. Japanese knotweed can tolerate deep shade, high temperatures, high soil salinity and drought. It is commonly found along streams and rivers, in low-lying areas, disturbed areas such as rights-of-way, and around old home and farmsteads.

 

Click this link for additional information about Japanese Knotweed, a New York Invasive Species.

 

LPSA News JUL 10th

Directories are available


THE NEW DIRECTORIES ARE HERE!!  
If you didn’t pick yours at the luncheon, they will be available at the FARMERS MARKET in Speculator this Thursday July 12, and next Thursday July 19 from 2:00-  5:00 pm. Please see the LPSA table in the pavilion.   

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Local News JUL 18th

Hamilton County Express – 7/19/2018

You can view the Hamilton County Express within the viewer (below) by using the navigation buttons across the top. If you want to view it full screen, just click on the four arrows icon, if you want to download it to your local computer, just click t...

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